LSD Unit:   4a       Michigan Curriculum Framework (2000)       "Using" Science Benchmarks

V.1.e.1


LSD Units

 
2b
4a
Describe major features of the earth's surface.
Key concepts: Types of landforms - mountains, plains, valleys; bodies of water - rivers, oceans, lakes (see EH-V.2 e.2); deserts.
Real-world contexts: Examples of Michigan surface features, such as hills, valleys, rivers, waterfalls, Great Lakes; pictures of global land features, including mountains, deserts.

V.1.e.3


LSD Units

 
2b
4a
Describe natural changes in the earth's surface.
Key concepts: Causes of changes - volcanoes, earthquakes, erosion (water, wind, gravity, glaciers). Results of change - valleys, hills, lakes, widened rivers, mountains, cracks, movement of earth materials (boulders, gravel, sand, clay).
Real-world contexts: Places around the school where erosion has occurred, such as gullies formed in down-hill gravel areas, cracks in asphalt. Places beyond the school where changes have occurred, such as volcanic mountains, shorelines, landslides, sand dunes, slopes, river valleys.

V.1.e.4


LSD Units

 
4a
Explain how rocks and fossils are used to understand the history of the earth.
Key concepts: Fossils, extinct plants and animals, ages of fossils, rock layers. See LE-III.4 e.1 (ancient life.)
Real-world contexts: Fossils found in gravel, mines, quarries, beaches (Petosky stones), museum displays; Michigan examples of layered rocks; specific examples of extinct plants and animals, such as dinosaurs.

V.2.e.2


LSD Units

 
2b
4a
Trace the path that rain water follows after it falls.
Key concepts: Precipitation - see EAW-V.3 e.1. Flow - downhill, to rivers, into the ground. Bodies of water - streams, rivers, lakes, oceans. See EG-V.1 e.1 (earth features).
Real-world contexts: Examples of water flowing locally, including gutters, drains, streams, wetlands.