LSD Unit:   4b       Michigan Curriculum Framework (2000)       "Using" Science Benchmarks

IV.1.e.2


LSD Units
 
Kb Primary
1b
3b
4b
5b

Identify properties of materials which make them useful.
Key concepts: Useful properties - unbreakable, water-proof, light-weight, conducts electricity (see PME-IV.1 e.4, electric circuits), conducts heat, attracted to a magnet, clear. See EG-V.1 e.4 (uses of earth materials).
Real-world contexts: Appropriate selection of materials for a particular use, such as waterproof raincoat, cotton or wool for clothing, glass for windows, metal pan to conduct heat, copper wire to conduct electricity.

IV.1.e.3


LSD Units
 
2c
3b
3c
4b
5b

Identify forms of energy associated with common phenomena.
Key concepts: Heat, light, sound, food energy, energy of motion, electricity (see PCM-IV.2 e.1 about heat, PWV-IV.4 e.1-4 about light and sound, PME-IV.1 e.4 about electricity, LEC-III.5 e.2 about energy from food).
Real-world contexts: Appropriate selection of energy and phenomena, such as appliances like a toaster or iron that use electricity, sun's heat to melt chocolate, water wheels, wind-up toys, warmth of sun on skin, windmills, music from guitar, simple electrical circuits with batteries, bulbs and bells.

IV.1.e.4


LSD Units
 
4b

Construct simple, useful electrical circuits. (3-5)
Key concepts and tools: Complete loop; batteries, bulbs, bells, motors, wires, electrical switches (see PME-IV.1 e.2, materials that conduct electricity).
Real-world contexts: Flashlights, battery-powered toys.

IV.1.e.5


LSD Units
 
4b

Describe possible electrical hazards to be avoided at home and at school. (K-2)
Key concepts: Shock, wall outlet, hazards; see PME-IV.1 e.3 (electrical energy).
Real-world contexts: Electric outlets, power lines, frayed electric cords, electric appliances, lightning, hair dryers in sinks and tubs.